Troubleshooting English Grammar

1Answer: 

Match the sentence fragment solution to the correct sentence fragment problem: Fragment that lacks both a subject and a verb Solutions: a. Add a subject to the fragment to make it a complete sentence. b. Combine the fragment with another sentence. c. Add a complete verb or a helping verb to make the sentence complete or combine the fragment with another sentence. d. Combine the fragment with another sentence, or rewrite the fragment as a complete sentence, eliminating the subordinating conjunction or the relative pronoun and adding a subject or other words necessary to make a complete thought.

2Answer: 

Match the sentence fragment solution to the correct sentence fragment problem: Fragment that lacks a subject Solutions: a. Add a subject to the fragment to make it a complete sentence. b. Combine the fragment with another sentence. c. Add a complete verb or a helping verb to make the sentence complete or combine the fragment with another sentence. d. Combine the fragment with another sentence, or rewrite the fragment as a complete sentence, eliminating the subordinating conjunction or the relative pronoun and adding a subject or other words necessary to make a complete thought.

3Answer: 

Match the sentence fragment solution to the correct sentence fragment problem: Fragment that is a subordinate clause Solutions: a. Add a subject to the fragment to make it a complete sentence. b. Combine the fragment with another sentence. c. Add a complete verb or a helping verb to make the sentence complete or combine the fragment with another sentence. d. Combine the fragment with another sentence, or rewrite the fragment as a complete sentence, eliminating the subordinating conjunction or the relative pronoun and adding a subject or other words necessary to make a complete thought.

4Answer: 

Match the sentence fragment solution to the correct sentence fragment problem: Fragment that lacks a complete verb Solutions: a. Add a subject to the fragment to make it a complete sentence. b. Combine the fragment with another sentence. c. Add a complete verb or a helping verb to make the sentence complete or combine the fragment with another sentence. d. Combine the fragment with another sentence, or rewrite the fragment as a complete sentence, eliminating the subordinating conjunction or the relative pronoun and adding a subject or other words necessary to make a complete thought.

5Answer: 

Match the run-on sentence solution to the correct run-on sentence problem: Two main clauses with no punctuation between them Solutions: a. Insert a comma before the coordinating conjunction to separate the two main clauses. b. Separate the main clauses with an end mark of punctuation, such as a period or a question mark, and begin the second sentence with a capital letter, or separate the main clauses with a semicolon, or insert a comma and a coordinating conjunction between the main clauses. c. Replace the comma with an end mark of punctuation such as a period or question mark, and begin the new sentence with a capital letter, or place a semicolon between the two main clauses, or insert a coordinating conjunction after the comma.

6Answer: 

Match the run-on sentence solution to the correct run-on sentence problem: Comma splice-two main clauses separated only by a comma Solutions: a. Insert a comma before the coordinating conjunction to separate the two main clauses. b. Separate the main clauses with an end mark of punctuation, such as a period or a question mark, and begin the second sentence with a capital letter, or separate the main clauses with a semicolon, or insert a comma and a coordinating conjunction between the main clauses. c. Replace the comma with an end mark of punctuation such as a period or question mark, and begin the new sentence with a capital letter, or place a semicolon between the two main clauses, or insert a coordinating conjunction after the comma.

7Answer: 

Match the run-on sentence solution to the correct run-on sentence problem: Two main clauses with no comma before the coordinating conjunction Solutions: a. Insert a comma before the coordinating conjunction to separate the two main clauses. b. Separate the main clauses with an end mark of punctuation, such as a period or a question mark, and begin the second sentence with a capital letter, or separate the main clauses with a semicolon, or insert a comma and a coordinating conjunction between the main clauses. c. Replace the comma with an end mark of punctuation such as a period or question mark, and begin the new sentence with a capital letter, or place a semicolon between the two main clauses, or insert a coordinating conjunction after the comma.

8Answer: 

Match the lack of subject-verb agreement solution to the correct lack of subject-verb agreement problem: A subject that is separated from the verb by an intervening prepositional phrase Solutions: a. Determine whether the noun of amount refers to one unit and is therefore singular or whether it refers to a number of individual units and is therefore plural. b. Make the verb agree with the subject, which is never the object of the preposition. c. If the collective noun refers to a group as a whole, use a singular verb, or if the collective noun refers to each member of a group individually, use a plural verb. d. Ignore the predicate nominative, and make the verb agree with the subject of the sentence. e. In an inverted sentence look for the subject after the verb. Then make sure the verb agrees with the subject.

9Answer: 

Match the lack of subject-verb agreement solution to the correct lack of subject-verb agreement problem: A predicate nominative that differs in number from the subject Solutions: a. Determine whether the noun of amount refers to one unit and is therefore singular or whether it refers to a number of individual units and is therefore plural. b. Make the verb agree with the subject, which is never the object of the preposition. c. If the collective noun refers to a group as a whole, use a singular verb, or if the collective noun refers to each member of a group individually, use a plural verb. d. Ignore the predicate nominative, and make the verb agree with the subject of the sentence. e. In an inverted sentence look for the subject after the verb. Then make sure the verb agrees with the subject.

10Answer: 

Match the lack of subject-verb agreement solution to the correct lack of subject-verb agreement problem: A subject that follows the verb Solutions: a. Determine whether the noun of amount refers to one unit and is therefore singular or whether it refers to a number of individual units and is therefore plural. b. Make the verb agree with the subject, which is never the object of the preposition. c. If the collective noun refers to a group as a whole, use a singular verb, or if the collective noun refers to each member of a group individually, use a plural verb. d. Ignore the predicate nominative, and make the verb agree with the subject of the sentence. e. In an inverted sentence look for the subject after the verb. Then make sure the verb agrees with the subject.

11Answer: 

Match the lack of subject-verb agreement solution to the correct lack of subject-verb agreement problem: A collective noun as the subject Solutions: a. Determine whether the noun of amount refers to one unit and is therefore singular or whether it refers to a number of individual units and is therefore plural. b. Make the verb agree with the subject, which is never the object of the preposition. c. If the collective noun refers to a group as a whole, use a singular verb, or if the collective noun refers to each member of a group individually, use a plural verb. d. Ignore the predicate nominative, and make the verb agree with the subject of the sentence. e. In an inverted sentence look for the subject after the verb. Then make sure the verb agrees with the subject.

12Answer: 

Match the lack of subject-verb agreement solution to the correct lack of subject-verb agreement problem: A noun of amount as the subject Solutions: a. Determine whether the noun of amount refers to one unit and is therefore singular or whether it refers to a number of individual units and is therefore plural. b. Make the verb agree with the subject, which is never the object of the preposition. c. If the collective noun refers to a group as a whole, use a singular verb, or if the collective noun refers to each member of a group individually, use a plural verb. d. Ignore the predicate nominative, and make the verb agree with the subject of the sentence. e. In an inverted sentence look for the subject after the verb. Then make sure the verb agrees with the subject.

13Answer: 

Match the lack of subject-verb agreement solution to the correct lack of subject-verb agreement problem: A compound subject that is joined by and Solutions: a. Make the verb agree with the subject that is closer to it. b. Determine whether the indefinite pronoun is singular or plural and make the verb agree. c. If the parts of the compound subject do not belong to one unit or they refer to different people or things, use a plural verb, or if the parts of the compound subject belong to one unit or if both parts refer to the same person or thing, use a singular verb. d. Use a singular verb when many a, each, or every precedes a compound subject. e. Ignore an intervening expression between a subject and its verb. Make the verb agree with the subject.

14Answer: 

Match the lack of subject-verb agreement solution to the correct lack of subject-verb agreement problem: A compound subject that is joined by or or nor Solutions: a. Make the verb agree with the subject that is closer to it. b. Determine whether the indefinite pronoun is singular or plural and make the verb agree. c. If the parts of the compound subject do not belong to one unit or they refer to different people or things, use a plural verb, or if the parts of the compound subject belong to one unit or if both parts refer to the same person or thing, use a singular verb. d. Use a singular verb when many a, each, or every precedes a compound subject. e. Ignore an intervening expression between a subject and its verb. Make the verb agree with the subject.

15Answer: 

Match the lack of subject-verb agreement solution to the correct lack of subject-verb agreement problem: A compound subject that is preceded by many a, every, or each Solutions: a. Make the verb agree with the subject that is closer to it. b. Determine whether the indefinite pronoun is singular or plural and make the verb agree. c. If the parts of the compound subject do not belong to one unit or they refer to different people or things, use a plural verb, or if the parts of the compound subject belong to one unit or if both parts refer to the same person or thing, use a singular verb. d. Use a singular verb when many a, each, or every precedes a compound subject. e. Ignore an intervening expression between a subject and its verb. Make the verb agree with the subject.

16Answer: 

Match the lack of subject-verb agreement solution to the correct lack of subject-verb agreement problem: A subject that is separated from the very by an intervening expression Solutions: a. Make the verb agree with the subject that is closer to it. b. Determine whether the indefinite pronoun is singular or plural and make the verb agree. c. If the parts of the compound subject do not belong to one unit or they refer to different people or things, use a plural verb, or if the parts of the compound subject belong to one unit or if both parts refer to the same person or thing, use a singular verb. d. Use a singular verb when many a, each, or every precedes a compound subject. e. Ignore an intervening expression between a subject and its verb. Make the verb agree with the subject.

17Answer: 

Match the lack of subject-verb agreement solution to the correct lack of subject-verb agreement problem: An indefinite pronoun as the subject Solutions: a. Make the verb agree with the subject that is closer to it. b. Determine whether the indefinite pronoun is singular or plural and make the verb agree. c. If the parts of the compound subject do not belong to one unit or they refer to different people or things, use a plural verb, or if the parts of the compound subject belong to one unit or if both parts refer to the same person or thing, use a singular verb. d. Use a singular verb when many a, each, or every precedes a compound subject. e. Ignore an intervening expression between a subject and its verb. Make the verb agree with the subject.

18Answer: 

Match the lack of pronoun-antecedent agreement solution to the correct lack of pronoun-antecedent agreement problem: A singular antecedent that can be either male or female Solutions: a. Determine whether the indefinite pronoun antecedent is singular or plural, and make the noun agree. b. Reword the sentence to use he or she, him or her and so on, or reword the sentence so that both the antecedent and the pronoun are plural, or reword the sentence to eliminate the pronoun. c. Use the appropriate third-person pronoun, or use an appropriate noun instead of a pronoun.

19Answer: 

Match the lack of pronoun-antecedent agreement solution to the correct lack of pronoun-antecedent agreement problem: A second-person pronoun that refers to a third-person antecedent Solutions: a. Determine whether the indefinite pronoun antecedent is singular or plural, and make the noun agree. b. Reword the sentence to use he or she, him or her and so on, or reword the sentence so that both the antecedent and the pronoun are plural, or reword the sentence to eliminate the pronoun. c. Use the appropriate third-person pronoun, or use an appropriate noun instead of a pronoun.

20Answer: 

Match the lack of pronoun-antecedent agreement solution to the correct lack of pronoun-antecedent agreement problem: A singular indefinite pronoun as an antecedent Solutions: a. Determine whether the indefinite pronoun antecedent is singular or plural, and make the noun agree. b. Reword the sentence to use he or she, him or her and so on, or reword the sentence so that both the antecedent and the pronoun are plural, or reword the sentence to eliminate the pronoun. c. Use the appropriate third-person pronoun, or use an appropriate noun instead of a pronoun.

21Answer: 

Match the lack of clear pronoun reference to the correct lack of clear pronoun reference solution: A pronoun reference that is weak or vague Solutions: a. Rewrite the sentence, eliminating the pronoun entirely, or rewrite the sentence, substituting a noun for the pronoun. b. Rewrite the sentence, substituting a noun for the pronoun, or rewrite the sentence, making the antecedent of the pronoun clear. c. Rewrite the sentence, adding a clear antecedent for the pronoun, rewrite the sentence, substituting a noun for the pronoun.

22Answer: 

Match the lack of clear pronoun reference to the correct lack of clear pronoun reference solution: A pronoun that could refer to more than one antecedent Solutions: a. Rewrite the sentence, eliminating the pronoun entirely, or rewrite the sentence, substituting a noun for the pronoun. b. Rewrite the sentence, substituting a noun for the pronoun, or rewrite the sentence, making the antecedent of the pronoun clear. c. Rewrite the sentence, adding a clear antecedent for the pronoun, rewrite the sentence, substituting a noun for the pronoun.

23Answer: 

Match the lack of clear pronoun reference to the correct lack of clear pronoun reference solution: The indefinite use of you or they Solutions: a. Rewrite the sentence, eliminating the pronoun entirely, or rewrite the sentence, substituting a noun for the pronoun. b. Rewrite the sentence, substituting a noun for the pronoun, or rewrite the sentence, making the antecedent of the pronoun clear. c. Rewrite the sentence, adding a clear antecedent for the pronoun, rewrite the sentence, substituting a noun for the pronoun.

24Answer: 

An incorrect shift in person between two pronouns can be corrected by replacing the incorrect pronoun with an appropriate noun, or by replacing the incorrect pronoun with a pronoun that agrees with its antecedent. a. true b. false

25Answer: 

Match the shift in verb tense reference to the correct solution: A lack of correct shift in tenses to show that one event precedes or follows another Solutions: a. When two or more events occur at the same time, be sure to use the same verb tense to describe both or all events. b. Shift from the past tense to the past perfect tense to indicate that one action began and ended before another past action began. Use the past perfect tense for the earlier of the two actions.

26Answer: 

Match the shift in verb tense reference to the correct solution: An unnecessary shift in tense Solutions: a. When two or more events occur at the same time, be sure to use the same verb tense to describe both or all events. b. Shift from the past tense to the past perfect tense to indicate that one action began and ended before another past action began. Use the past perfect tense for the earlier of the two actions.

27Answer: 

Match the incorrect verb tense or form reference to the correct solution: An incorrect or missing verb ending Solutions: a. Replace the past participle with the past form of the verb, or add the auxiliary verb have to the past participle to form a complete verb. b. Use the past participle form of an irregular verb not the past form, when you use the auxiliary verb have. c. Add -ed to a regular verb to form the past tense and the past participle. d. Irregular verbs form their past tense and past participle in some way other than by adding -ed.

28Answer: 

Match the incorrect verb tense or form reference to the correct solution: An improperly formed irregular verb Solutions: a. Replace the past participle with the past form of the verb, or add the auxiliary verb have to the past participle to form a complete verb. b. Use the past participle form of an irregular verb not the past form, when you use the auxiliary verb have. c. Add -ed to a regular verb to form the past tense and the past participle. d. Irregular verbs form their past tense and past participle in some way other than by adding -ed.

29Answer: 

Match the incorrect verb tense or form reference to the correct solution: Confusion between the past form and the past participle Solutions: a. Replace the past participle with the past form of the verb, or add the auxiliary verb have to the past participle to form a complete verb. b. Use the past participle form of an irregular verb not the past form, when you use the auxiliary verb have. c. Add -ed to a regular verb to form the past tense and the past participle. d. Irregular verbs form their past tense and past participle in some way other than by adding -ed.

30Answer: 

Match the incorrect verb tense or form reference to the correct solution: Improper use of the past participle Solutions: a. Replace the past participle with the past form of the verb, or add the auxiliary verb have to the past participle to form a complete verb. b. Use the past participle form of an irregular verb not the past form, when you use the auxiliary verb have. c. Add -ed to a regular verb to form the past tense and the past participle. d. Irregular verbs form their past tense and past participle in some way other than by adding -ed.

31Answer: 

Match the misplaced or dangling modifier reference to the correct solution: A misplaced modifier Solution: a. Rewrite the sentence, adding a noun to which the dangling phrase clearly refers. Often you will have to add other words to make the meaning of the sentence clear. b. Move the misplaced phrase as close as possible to the word or words it modifies. c. Place the adverb only immediately before the word or group of words it modifies.

32Answer: 

Match the misplaced or dangling modifier reference to the correct solution: The adverb only misplaced Solution: a. Rewrite the sentence, adding a noun to which the dangling phrase clearly refers. Often you will have to add other words to make the meaning of the sentence clear. b. Move the misplaced phrase as close as possible to the word or words it modifies. c. Place the adverb only immediately before the word or group of words it modifies.

33Answer: 

Match the missing or misplaced possessive apostrophe reference to the correct solution: A dangling modifier Solution: a. Rewrite the sentence, adding a noun to which the dangling phrase clearly refers. Often you will have to add other words to make the meaning of the sentence clear. b. Move the misplaced phrase as close as possible to the word or words it modifies. c. Place the adverb only immediately before the word or group of words it modifies.

34Answer: 

Match the misplaced or dangling modifier reference to the correct solution: singular nouns Solution: a. Do not use an apostrophe to form the possessive of it; use an apostrophe to form the contraction of it is. b. Use an apostrophe and an -s to form the possessive of a singular noun, even one that ends in -s. c. Use an apostrophe and an -s to form the possessive of a singular indefinite pronoun, or do not use an apostrophe with any of the possessive personal pronouns. d. Use an apostrophe alone to form the possessive of a plural noun that ends in -s. e. Use an apostrophe and an -s to form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in -s.

35Answer: 

Match the missing or misplaced possessive apostrophe reference to the correct solution: Plural nouns ending in -s Solution: a. Do not use an apostrophe to form the possessive of it; use an apostrophe to form the contraction of it is. b. Use an apostrophe and an -s to form the possessive of a singular noun, even one that ends in -s. c. Use an apostrophe and an -s to form the possessive of a singular indefinite pronoun, or do not use an apostrophe with any of the possessive personal pronouns. d. Use an apostrophe alone to form the possessive of a plural noun that ends in -s. e. Use an apostrophe and an -s to form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in -s.

36Answer: 

Match the missing or misplaced possessive apostrophe reference to the correct solution: Plural nouns not ending in -s Solution: a. Do not use an apostrophe to form the possessive of it; use an apostrophe to form the contraction of it is. b. Use an apostrophe and an -s to form the possessive of a singular noun, even one that ends in -s. c. Use an apostrophe and an -s to form the possessive of a singular indefinite pronoun, or do not use an apostrophe with any of the possessive personal pronouns. d. Use an apostrophe alone to form the possessive of a plural noun that ends in -s. e. Use an apostrophe and an -s to form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in -s.

37Answer: 

Match the missing or misplaced possessive apostrophe reference to the correct solution: Pronouns Solution: a. Do not use an apostrophe to form the possessive of it; use an apostrophe to form the contraction of it is. b. Use an apostrophe and an -s to form the possessive of a singular noun, even one that ends in -s. c. Use an apostrophe and an -s to form the possessive of a singular indefinite pronoun, or do not use an apostrophe with any of the possessive personal pronouns. d. Use an apostrophe alone to form the possessive of a plural noun that ends in -s. e. Use an apostrophe and an -s to form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in -s.

38Answer: 

Match the missing or misplaced possessive apostrophe reference to the correct solution: Confusion between its and it's Solution: a. Do not use an apostrophe to form the possessive of it; use an apostrophe to form the contraction of it is. b. Use an apostrophe and an -s to form the possessive of a singular noun, even one that ends in -s. c. Use an apostrophe and an -s to form the possessive of a singular indefinite pronoun, or do not use an apostrophe with any of the possessive personal pronouns. d. Use an apostrophe alone to form the possessive of a plural noun that ends in -s. e. Use an apostrophe and an -s to form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in -s.

39Answer: 

Match the missing commas with nonessential element reference to the correct solution: Missing commas with nonessential participles, infinitives, and their phrases Solutions: a. Set off the interjection or parenthetical expression with commas. b. Determine whether the appositive is truly not essential to the meaning of the sentence. If so, set off the appositive with commas. c. Determine whether the participle, infinitive, or phrase is truly not essential to the meaning of the sentence. If it is not essential, set off the phrases with commas. d. Determine whether the clause is truly not essential to the meaning of the sentence. If it is not essential, set off the clause with commas.

40Answer: 

Match the missing commas with nonessential element reference to the correct solution: Missing commas with nonessential adjective clauses Solutions: a. Set off the interjection or parenthetical expression with commas. b. Determine whether the appositive is truly not essential to the meaning of the sentence. If so, set off the appositive with commas. c. Determine whether the participle, infinitive, or phrase is truly not essential to the meaning of the sentence. If it is not essential, set off the phrases with commas. d. Determine whether the clause is truly not essential to the meaning of the sentence. If it is not essential, set off the clause with commas.

41Answer: 

Match the missing commas with nonessential element reference to the correct solution: Missing commas with nonessential appositives Solutions: a. Set off the interjection or parenthetical expression with commas. b. Determine whether the appositive is truly not essential to the meaning of the sentence. If so, set off the appositive with commas. c. Determine whether the participle, infinitive, or phrase is truly not essential to the meaning of the sentence. If it is not essential, set off the phrases with commas. d. Determine whether the clause is truly not essential to the meaning of the sentence. If it is not essential, set off the clause with commas.

42Answer: 

Match the missing commas with nonessential element reference to the correct solution: Missing commas with interjections and parenthetical expressions Solutions: a. Set off the interjection or parenthetical expression with commas. b. Determine whether the appositive is truly not essential to the meaning of the sentence. If so, set off the appositive with commas. c. Determine whether the participle, infinitive, or phrase is truly not essential to the meaning of the sentence. If it is not essential, set off the phrases with commas. d. Determine whether the clause is truly not essential to the meaning of the sentence. If it is not essential, set off the clause with commas.

43Answer: 

Susan is very artistic. She paints in several different mediums. a. sentence is punctuated correctly b. sentence is punctuated incorrectly

44Answer: 

Missing commas in a series of words, phrases, or clauses can be corrected by using a comma after each of three or more elements in a series including the element that precedes a conjunction. a. true b. false

45Answer: 

Bill felt ill and left the stadium. During the half-time show. a. sentence is correct as shown b. sentence is incorrect

46Answer: 

My cousin just started to swim on a swim team and he wants me to swim on the team as well. a. sentence is correct as shown b. sentence is incorrect

47Answer: 

The ice hockey team have won consistently. a. sentence is correct as shown b. sentence is incorrect

48Answer: 

A complex system of roads links the two cities. a. sentence is correct as shown b. sentence is incorrect

49Answer: 

Paula told me the answer to question 50 on the test. I have forgotten what the answer was. a. sentence is punctuated correctly b. sentence is punctuated incorrectly

50Answer: 

Neither of the boys at the birthday party finished his piece of birthday cake. a. sentence is correct as shown b. sentence is incorrect

51Answer: 

Juana opens the can of coffee and savored the aroma. a. sentence is correct as shown b. sentence is incorrect

52Answer: 

Jason swum across the pool. a. sentence is correct as shown b. sentence is incorrect

53Answer: 

The spotted insects fascinated the young children with their long curly antennae. a. sentence is correct as shown b. sentence is incorrect

54Answer: 

The officers quarters are in the single story building. a. sentence is correct as shown b. sentence is incorrect

55Answer: 

On the wall hang two handsome watercolors. a. sentence is correct as shown b. sentence is incorrect

56Answer: 

The turbulent waves, gleaming in the sunlight, pounded the barren beach. a. sentence is correct as shown b. sentence is incorrect

57Answer: 

The motor sputtered coughed whined and finally died. a. sentence is correct as shown b. sentence is incorrect

58Answer: 

Anyone's guess is as good as mine. a. sentence is correct as shown b. sentence is incorrect

59Answer: 

Sabra saw a bright light in the sky. A meteor with brilliant colors was streaking by. a. sentence is correct as shown b. sentence is incorrect

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